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Business Stakeholders: How to Describe a Software FEATURE

A feature from the biz perspective

What is a feature?
A feature is an aspect of software that is useful. Anything you can express, that is possible, and that you can afford, can be a feature. A bug is an aspect of software that isn’t useful.

Since we’re talking about development, we’re discussing software features that don’t exist yet. These are features that we would like to build, or existing features that we would like to make better. Describe a feature with should statements:

  • It should email all the clients once a month.
  • The client should have a setting page in the admin area.
  • The plugin should have a custom post type called GPS coordinates for each subscriber.
  • The div should show a timeline of Civil War battles in the footer area.

The next statement you should create is the reason for the feature you are requesting. What is the business value of this feature? Describe the reason by using a “Because”, or “So that”  or “In or that”

  • So that the clients are routinely updated.
  • In order that the user can change the settings.
  • Because we need to store the GPS data.

Alternatively, you can use Gherkin syntax for feature development.

SEO Article Type “H” Test Article

You’ll get an extra hour added onto your time for reading these directions.

DO NOT UNDER AND CIRCUMSTANCES COPY AND PASTE ANYTHING. You can copy stuff by re-writing it, or re-ordering sentences, but not word for word. You will be fired and reported to UpWork. If you submit poor but original work, I will pay you and give you a 5 star rating no matter what. If you submit plagiarized work, I will fire you and give you bad report.


You only need to write the body of the article. Don’t write introductions or conclusions / summations. Just jump right into the article. Someone else will write the intro and conclusion.

Put section headers in your work. At least every 400 words, but can be more often.

<h2>tags</h2> on your section headers.

Paragraphs should be only 3 sentences long. No exceptions. It’s more important that it be 3 sentences than that it makes sense.

When you are done, email your article to “johndeebdd@gmail.com” and log off UpWork.

Good luck! If this works out, I’ll have more work for you!

-John Dee

Vanishing Checkbox in WordPress Comment Form

This is the tale of the incredible vanishing checkbox, on WordPress versions 4.9.6 and 4.9.8.

WordPress uses cookies by default to log in users and track who is making a comment. Cookies are small snippets of data kept on a user’s browser. WordPress is trying to deal with the new GDPR regulations. It seems from following Trac, that it’s a giant cluster fuck.

This annoying checkbox was forced onto every WordPress site in the world as of 4.9.6:

As soon as I saw this monster I started making a plugin to roll it back. It was obvious to me that most sites wouldn’t want this, and that it served absolutely no purpose. It comes from a misunderstanding of the law, and a desire to be clever.

 

 

 

 

There is no requirement in GDPR for websites to display a check box for cookie use. None, totally false.

Then comes out 4.9.8 which removed the check-box that was just installed!

However! This revert also breaks functionality. Users who aren’t logged in have no way now of knowing that their comment was submitted.

So the situation as of 4.9.8 is that the comment cookie check box came and went, and now everybody’s site is broken.

You can solve the problem by re-activating the comment check box in the admin SETTINGS >> DISCUSSION, but then you’ll still have the checkbox. Or use this plugin to restore functionality to the way it was.