WordPress

Roles in WordPress development

First of all, the word roles, has several meanings. This article refers to social roles human beings play in relation to one another during development.
On a WordPress site, there is a technical concept known as user roles and capabilities. The default ones are subscriber, contributor, editor, and administrator. This article isn’t referring to that use of the word roles.
Roles can be played by the same person, but usually aren’t in direct relation to the size of the project and organization.

  • business stakeholder – [aka the client, the product owner, the guy with the money] – This person wants software. It is from him the requirements flow, and hopefully the money.
  • project manager – [aka “Jobs”] Sharing financial awareness, and responsibility to a budget with the business stakeholder, the PM has overall responsibility for the project, usually including the ability to hire and fire people. This expert can, and must, throttle the efficiency of the project, and therefore should be paid in equity or a salary, not hourly.
  • developer – [aka “Woz”] the developer is a senior programmer. This person must have a global perspective of the project or at least on a major unit of the project. He can be paid a salary or hourly. Rates run from $20 – $150 hr based on experience.
  • architect – [QA architect, senior developer] This person sets up the development environment in conjunction with the PM and the developer. John Dee is an expert in WordPress plugin development architecture and can help you set up yours!
  • programmer – this junior to the developer writes code. He can be “front end” [javascript] or “back end” [PHP] or both. It is appropriate to pay a programmer hourly, or per project. Rates are from, gratis to $25 hr.
  • designer – In WordPress, a “designer” is a person who can modify themes. He can either be skilled at using a graphic page builder, or WYSIWYG editor, or they may know CSS and HTML. You should not employ a designer who cannot produce clean CSS and HTML code. Settings jockeys – designers who don’t know how to hard code things – should never be used. Rates are from about $7/hr to $20/hr

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